Corn Syrup Doesn’t Cause Type 2 Diabetes

Corn Syrup is Safe to Eat

Just don’t eat it, its not good for you

Corn Syrup Tank Car

Corn syrup by the tank car.

Sorry, I just can’t get riled up about eating foods flavored with corn syrup.  It really is safe to eat.  It won’t kill or harm you.

Having said that, I avoid the stuff as much as possible.  It really doesn’t do you or me any good.

 

 

 

But first

The Numbers:

  • Fasting Blood Glucose:  96 mg/dl.  Good, safe, but not great.  In the 80’s yesterday.  Late night dinner with brown rice, probably did it.
  • Exercise:  45 minutes on the trainer.  I am too much of a warm weather wimp.  Better to stay in the garage with the bike on a trainer.
  • Weight: 183ish
  • Mood: 7.5

The Menu:

  • Breakfast:  Morning fruit medley and oatmeal with craisins.
  • Lunch:  Leftover pot roast with brown rice and vegetables
  • Dinner:  A family fave, vegetarian chalupas.  Fast, cheap, easy to make and cheap.  Inexpensive, too.
  • Snacks.  Didn’t have any.  No time.

Articles such about the dangers of corn syrup hit the internet just after Thanksgiving, just as the serious holiday eating season was commencing.  It’s found in all sorts of the prepared foods we buy, more than we probably realized.

Some people have to spoil everything.

Related to consuming it were higher incidences of type 2 diabetes, obesity and metabolic syndrome, all bad things.

Yes, there is an association, but it’s not a cause.  The stuff is mostly harmless.

Most of the corn syrup consumed, specifically high fructose corn syrup (HFCS), is used in processed foods, from soft drinks, baked goods, canned goods, salad dressings, juice cocktails and breakfast cereals being some favorite every items on the grocer’s shelves.

The main reason HFCS is used is simple.  We like sweetness in our foods.  We are geared to like sweet things.  Our tongues have more taste buds for sweetness than any other flavor.  We like to eat lots of foods that have at least a base sweetness to them.  Food processors know that all too well.

For food processors there’s more.   HFCS is cheap, plentiful, stable in baked goods and easy and unfussy to use.

Sweetness, and thus HFCS, creates crave-worthy foods, ranging from Krispy Kreme doughnuts to Sara Lee Heart Healthy Whole Grain Bread to Doritos to Special K cereal and to flavored yogurts.  It’s used in every sort of processed food imaginable.

That is where the real problem occurs.  We eat too much processed, crave-worthy, affordable and high caloric-density foods.  The HFCS just comes along for the ride, adding sweetness and calories.  We consume too much and suffer from obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

At our house, we tried to cut out processed foods as much a possible.  If you are willing  use a bunch of common sense and some preparation, it’s not that hard.

We discovered what Mark Bittman wrote about in this Kindle single called Cooking Solves Everything.  You can make easy to prepare foods at home that taste as good as what you get off the grocer’s shelves or in a restaurant.   It’s really that simple.

We used to eat out way too much and for convenience sake just bought too many prepared items.  That changed and we are the healthier for it.

There is one problem Bittman addresses, if not entirely successfully, cleaning up the dishes after the meal.  We solved that with a simple plan. If the Charming Mrs. SWMBO cooks, I clean up the kitchen.  If I cook, I clean up the kitchen.

Well, she does all of the laundry, so it works out.

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Corn Syrup Doesn’t Cause Type 2 Diabetes was last modified: December 11th, 2012 by Dave LeBlanc
Posted in Type 2 diabetic diets and tagged , , , , .

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